Habitat Restoration and Sustainable Fisheries

SOMALIA HAS THE LONGEST COASTLINE IN AFRICA, AND ITS MARINE ENVIRONMENT IS CRITICAL FOR LIVELIHOODS, FOOD SECURITY, ECOLOGY, AND TRADE AND CULTURE.

A man prepares to process a tuna at the Bosaso harbor in Puntland, Somalia, Thursday, 29 Jan, 2015. Adeso/ KAREL PRINSLOO.

Background

Unfortunately, Somalia coastal resources have fallen prey to illegal fishing, hazardous waste dumping, and dynamite and cyanide fishing. The destruction of mangroves for charcoal has further destabilized the coastal environment and destroyed fish habitat. With fisheries degraded and food security threatened, infrastructure for fishing was neglected, knowledge of the coastal environment and fisheries was lost, and young men were drawn into crime and extremism. Largely as a result, the Puntland region of Somalia has become associated more with piracy than fishing.

Charcoal production and trafficking is the main driver of conflict between communities in Somalia, and since it provides cash to insurgents, it has also become a security threat and a major impediment to peace processes at the national and regional level.

In addition to coastal ecological destruction, the environment suffers from offshore illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) fishing, which takes place habitually in Somalia, mostly when the fish are most plentiful.

Our Approach

This projects aims to promote Sustainable Coastal Habitat Restoration and improved fisheries management in the coastal area of Puntland, Somalia through activities that are in line with local values and needs. Building on 23 years of programs in the region, we are developing practical community-level responses to illegal fishing and training communities in coastal ecosystem management, while restoring mangroves and planting date palms to stabilize the soil and improve food security and livelihoods.

Expected Outcomes

The project will help restore marine and coastal resources on which Somalis rely, improving food security, livelihoods, and governance, while reducing the appeal of piracy and extremism. Not only will this project secure a clear environmental achievement and advance an environmental campaign, but it will strengthen Adeso’s work to achieve environmental outcomes in East Africa through grassroots community activism.

Long-Term Impacts:

  • Restored coastal ecosystems and fisheries
  • Improved knowledge and capacity to take part in coastal ecosystem and sustainable fisheries management
  • Improving food security through fisheries and date palms
  • New livelihood opportunities through date palm nurseries and fisheries
  • Poverty alleviation through livelihoods and food security
  • Reduced appeal of piracy and extremism