Improved Infant and Child Feeding Practices -The Story of Abigael

Published May 28, 2015 by

Paulina Silale, a grandmother and a member of a mother support group in Kanamkemer Ward, Turkana County, recently received training on infant feeding.  As a result of the training, her four year old granddaughter is growing healthier and stronger by the day.

The project is supported by the Global Alliance for Improved Nutrition (GAIN) under the USAID funded Resilience for Economic Growth in Arid Lands- Improved Resilience (REGAL-IR) program.

Prior to the project Paulina did not possess sufficient knowledge about the benefits of feeding her grandchild a more balanced diet. This is a perspective which is widely shared among many of the mothers interviewed in the area.
Part of the training provided included identifying the optimal age to start complementary feeding. This includes supplementing the child’s diet with energy, iron and vitamin A.

After graduation from the training, the GAIN-REGAL-IR officer continues to visit Paulina and her group on a monthly basis to monitor their progress and address concerns around uptake of optimal infant feeding.
Eight months after the training, Paulina had this to say;

“For the last eight months, I have included fruits and vegetables in Abigael’s diet, I now see the difference in her health in comparison to my older children. She is more resistant to infections, and is more jovial and active. In addition, I myself experience great joy when I feed her”.

Paulina continues to attend the support group meetings as often as possible and her passion to share her experiences with Abigael to other grandmothers and lactating-mothers is amazing. Paulina has become Adeso’s champion in Apetet village, as a strong advocate of complementary.


This project is made possible by the support of the American people through the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and Feed the Future Initiative (FtF).  The contents of this story are the sole responsibility of Adeso and do not necessarily reflect the views of USAID or the United States government.