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30 th
Apr 2015

Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated (IUU) Fishing in the Territorial Waters of Somalia

THE UNIVERSITY OF RHODES ISLAND AND TRANSAFRICA CO - 30th Apr 2015

IT IS DIFFICULT TO ESTIMATE THE LOSSES THAT FOREIGN ILLEGAL VESSELS CAUSE IN SOMALIA. ANNUAL ESTIMATES RANGE FROM US$ 100 MILLION TO OVER US$450 MILLION. In addition to loss in revenue, illegal ...

IT IS DIFFICULT TO ESTIMATE THE LOSSES THAT FOREIGN ILLEGAL VESSELS CAUSE IN SOMALIA. ANNUAL ESTIMATES RANGE FROM US$ 100 MILLION TO OVER US$450 MILLION.

In addition to loss in revenue, illegal vessels cause overfishing, reduce fish stocks, affect local catches, harm the marine environment and destroy fishing communities by denying opportunities to catch and export fish. Illegal fishing causes loss of employment in fishing and post-harvest fish handling as loss of revenue that could be generated from landing fees, license fees, taxes and other revenues payable by legal fishing companies.

The indirect harm of Illegal and Unregulated (IUU) fishing to Somalia includes lost income and employment in other sectors in the supply chain upstream (i.e., fishing gear, boats and equipment, etc.) and downstream (i.e., fish processing and packaging, marketing and transport, etc.) from the fishing operation itself . Additionally, illegal fishing vessels use reckless fishing operations. They leave behind them irreversible impacts on target species, the marine ecosystem and vulnerable species such as coral reefs, dugongs and turtles. Furthermore, IUU fishing directly affects fishermen’s livelihoods. It destroys their fishing nets and threatens them at sea by mistaking them for pirates thus depriving them of fully exercising their livelihoods.

The Somali fishery sector is predominantly small-scale. Fishermen use open fiberglass skiffs ranging in length from three to six meters. Most are motorized and equipped with an outboard engine or to a lesser extent, an inboard engine. The average fisherman has been fishing for about 15 years and is on average 38 years old. Most have an elementary level education and live in households with about eight members. More than half own their fishing boats and 50% are members of fishing cooperatives. Over a third fish within 10 km of their communities while 50% of the fishermen fish within 50 km of their communities.

Managing the fisheries begins with registration of fishermen and fishing boats. Fifty-four percent of fishermen reported no requirement for fishing boat registration or painting registration numbers on their vessels while 12% percent did not know about these requirements. When asked which entity was responsible for fishing boat registration, 41% identified the fisheries office and 47% identified the port authority. The latter plays that role in Somaliland and Puntland, while the fisheries office does so in the other states. The absence of information on the number and size of vessels, engine horsepower, and the types and sizes of fishing gear makes management decisions more difficult, if not impossible, to assess optimum sustainable yields.

Read the full report here for more information on IUU Fishing in Somalia and suggested recommendations.

18 th
Nov 2015

2014 Annual Report: Changing the Story

Adeso - 18th Nov 2015

In 2014, Adeso’s humanitarian and development efforts reached nearly 1.9 million people in Kenya, Somalia and South Sudan. One community at a time, our efforts this year focused on ...

In 2014, Adeso’s humanitarian and development efforts reached nearly 1.9 million people in Kenya, Somalia and South Sudan. One community at a time, our efforts this year focused on helping individuals and families build a better life for themselves.

19 th
Jan 2016

Turkana Basket Value-Chain Feasibility Study and Implementation Plan

REGAL-IR - 19th Jan 2016

The Turkana basket and handicrafts sector has been singled out as an opportunity for economic growth.  This  report  outlines the  process  for data collection,& ...

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The Turkana basket and handicrafts sector has been singled out as an opportunity for economic
growth. 

This  report  outlines the  process  for data collection,  critical  analysis and
recommendations, including a draft one-year budget. The report focuses on an implementation strategy  that  roadmaps  a  sustainable  and  scalable  path  to  professionalism,  businessdevelopment, and increased incomes.

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12 th
Feb 2016

Basketry Value Chain Study

12th Feb 2016

The Turkana basket and handicrafts sector has been singled out as an opportunity for economic growth. This report outlines the process for data collection, critical analysis and recommendat ...
The Turkana basket and handicrafts sector has been singled out as an opportunity for economic
growth. This report outlines the process for data collection, critical analysis and
recommendations, including a draft one-year budget. The report focuses on an implementation
strategy that roadmaps a sustainable and scalable path to professionalism, business
development, and increased incomes.
 
The philosophical approach for this study is grounded in transforming challenges into
opportunities. The analysis tools are rooted in a results-driven approach with a market focus.
Business development tools are recommended as a way to increase professionalism in social
entrepreneurship. As producers build professionalism, the industry’s capacity to compete in the global marketplace grows.
Particularly important to success is the inherent value of the Kenyan artisanal export context.
Kenya has important assets lacking in many African countries. These include a vibrant port with
multiple shipping options, experienced buyer agents, a broad selection of highly marketable
products, a strong international buyer base, relative ease of business operations and a stable
government. These factors are the essential foundation for growth of the Turkana handicraft
value chain.
01 st
Aug 2016

Adeso UK Signed Trustees Report and Accounts 20 September 2015

01st Aug 2016

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    19 th
    Feb 2015

    Hanging by a Thread: The ongoing threats to Somalia's remittance lifeline

    By Adeso, Oxfam, Global Center on Cooperative Securit

    Every year, Somalia receives approximately $1.3bn in remittances – money sent from the Somali diaspora to loved ones back home. Remittances account for between 25 and 45 percent ...

    By Adeso, Oxfam, Global Center on Cooperative Securit

    Every year, Somalia receives approximately $1.3bn in remittances – money sent from the Somali diaspora to loved ones back home. Remittances account for between 25 and 45 percent of Somalia’s economy and exceed the amount it receives in humanitarian aid, development aid and foreign direct investment combined. As Somali money transfer operators lose their bank accounts, Somali families are losing their only formal or transparent channel through which to send money. Somalia needs longterm support to build sustainable financial institutions as well as urgent help to maintain its current remittance flows.

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    19 th
    Feb 2015

    Somali - Hanging by a Thread: The ongoing threats to Somalia's remittance lifeline

    By Adeso, Oxfam, Global Center on Cooperative Securit

    Every year, Somalia receives approximately $1.3bn in remittances – money sent from the Somali diaspora to loved ones back home. Remittances account for between 25 and 45 percent ...

    By Adeso, Oxfam, Global Center on Cooperative Securit

    Every year, Somalia receives approximately $1.3bn in remittances – money sent from the Somali diaspora to loved ones back home. Remittances account for between 25 and 45 percent of Somalia’s economy and exceed the amount it receives in humanitarian aid, development aid and foreign direct investment combined. As Somali money transfer operators lose their bank accounts, Somali families are losing their only formal or transparent channel through which to send money. Somalia needs longterm support to build sustainable financial institutions as well as urgent help to maintain its current remittance flows.

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    19 th
    Feb 2015

    French - Hanging by a Thread: The ongoing threats to Somalia's remittance lifeline

    By Adeso, Oxfam, Global Center on Cooperative Securit

    Every year, Somalia receives approximately $1.3bn in remittances – money sent from the Somali diaspora to loved ones back home. Remittances account for between 25 and 45 percent ...

    By Adeso, Oxfam, Global Center on Cooperative Securit

    Every year, Somalia receives approximately $1.3bn in remittances – money sent from the Somali diaspora to loved ones back home. Remittances account for between 25 and 45 percent of Somalia’s economy and exceed the amount it receives in humanitarian aid, development aid and foreign direct investment combined. As Somali money transfer operators lose their bank accounts, Somali families are losing their only formal or transparent channel through which to send money. Somalia needs longterm support to build sustainable financial institutions as well as urgent help to maintain its current remittance flows.

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    19 th
    Feb 2015

    Arabic - Hanging by a Thread: The ongoing threats to Somalia's remittance lifeline

    By Adeso, Oxfam, Global Center on Cooperative Securit

    Every year, Somalia receives approximately $1.3bn in remittances – money sent from the Somali diaspora to loved ones back home. Remittances account for between 25 and 45 percent ...

    By Adeso, Oxfam, Global Center on Cooperative Securit

    Every year, Somalia receives approximately $1.3bn in remittances – money sent from the Somali diaspora to loved ones back home. Remittances account for between 25 and 45 percent of Somalia’s economy and exceed the amount it receives in humanitarian aid, development aid and foreign direct investment combined. As Somali money transfer operators lose their bank accounts, Somali families are losing their only formal or transparent channel through which to send money. Somalia needs longterm support to build sustainable financial institutions as well as urgent help to maintain its current remittance flows.

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    05 th
    Feb 2015

    Hanging by a Thread: The ongoing threat to Somalia's remittance lifeline

    Every year, the Somali diaspora sends home approximately $1.3bn. Remittances account for 25–45 percent of Somalia’s economy and exceed the amount it receives...

    Every year, the Somali diaspora sends home approximately $1.3bn. Remittances account for 25–45 percent of Somalia’s economy and exceed the amount it receives in humanitarian aid, development aid and foreign direct investment combined.

    As Somali money transfer operators lose their bank accounts, Somali families are losing their only formal or transparent channel through which to send money.

    Somalia needs long-term support to build sustainable financial institutions, and urgent help to maintain its current remittance flows. This briefing reviews international efforts to facilitate remittances to Somalia and focuses on the US and the UK , where the threat to the Somali remittance system is most acute. It also looks at the uncertain future viability of the Somali remittance industry in Australia.

    Download the full report in English by clicking below or:

    Download the full report in Somali
    Download the full report in French
    Download the full report in Arabic
    Download the full report in Spanish

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    29 th
    Oct 2014

    Piracy - Community Response to Illegal Fishing

    In this article prepared for the UAE Counter Piracy Conference 2014 (Securing State Recovery: Sustaining Momentum at Sea, Confronting Instability on Land), Degan Ali, Adeso’s ...

    In this article prepared for the UAE Counter Piracy Conference 2014 (Securing State Recovery: Sustaining Momentum at Sea, Confronting Instability on Land), Degan Ali, Adeso’s Executive Director, speaks about the root causes of piracy in Somalia, and the importance of tackling illegal fishing off the country’s coastline.

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    29 th
    Oct 2014

    Piracy - Community Response to Illegal Fishing

    In this article prepared for the UAE Counter Piracy Conference 2014 (Securing State Recovery: Sustaining Momentum at Sea, Confronting Instability on Land), Degan Ali, Adeso’s Executive Dir...

    In this article prepared for the UAE Counter Piracy Conference 2014 (Securing State Recovery: Sustaining Momentum at Sea, Confronting Instability on Land), Degan Ali, Adeso’s Executive Director, speaks about the root causes of piracy in Somalia, and the importance of tackling illegal fishing off the country’s coastline.

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    07 th
    Oct 2014

    From Crisis to Catastrophe: South Sudan's Man-Made Crisis (summary)

    More than two million people are facing severe food insecurity in South Sudan.

    Famine has been narrowly avoided in 2014. As the dry season begins, the brutal conflict tha...

    More than two million people are facing severe food insecurity in South Sudan.

    Famine has been narrowly avoided in 2014. As the dry season begins, the brutal conflict that provoked this disaster is about to get worse. Without an end to the fighting – and unless more aid can be delivered to those who need it – famine remains a serious threat in 2015. By committing to more vigorous diplomacy and swift action, the world has the chance to prevent that.

    This joint briefing note published by 36 agencies sets out the steps humanitarian agencies, parties to the conflict, the Government of South Sudan, the UN Security Council, the United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) and the international community must take to prevent a worse situation in 2015.

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    07 th
    Oct 2014

    From Crisis to Catastrophe: South Sudan's Man-Made Crisis

    More than two million people are facing severe food insecurity in South Sudan. Famine has been narrowly avoided in 2014.

    As the dry season begins, the brutal ...

    More than two million people are facing severe food insecurity in South Sudan. Famine has been narrowly avoided in 2014.

    As the dry season begins, the brutal conflict that provoked this disaster is about to get worse. 

    Without an end to the fighting – and unless more aid can be delivered to those who need it – famine remains a serious threat in 2015. By committing to more vigorous diplomacy and swift action, the world has the chance to prevent that.

    This joint briefing note published by 36 agencies sets out the steps humanitarian agencies, parties to the conflict, the Government of South Sudan, the UN Security Council, the United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) and the international community must take to prevent a worse situation in 2015.

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    26 th
    Aug 2014

    Risk-averse to risk-willing: Learning from the 2011 Somalia cash response

    Degan Ali and Kirsten Gel​sdorf

    In 2011 the humanitarian community faced a difficult question. Could large-scale cash transfers provide an effective a...

    Degan Ali and Kirsten Gel​sdorf

    In 2011 the humanitarian community faced a difficult question. Could large-scale cash transfers provide an effective alternative to food aid delivery in South Central Somalia to avert a famine?

    Ultimately, between August 2011 and May 2012, more than 81 million US dollars in the form of unconditional cash grants, vouchers and cash for work were provided to over 1.7 million people in South Central Somalia leading to an improvement in humanitarian conditions.

    Despite this eventual accomplishment, months of protracted debate went by before there was broad endorsement for large-scale cash and voucher programming, delaying critical action.

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